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AMSAT NEWS SERVICE ANS 338

07.12.2000 01:04:36
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ANS is a free, weekly, news and information service of AMSAT North America, the Radio Amateur Satellite Corporation. ANS reports on the activities of a worldwide group of Amateur Radio operators who share an active interest in designing, building, launching and communicating through analog and digital Amateur Radio satellites. ANS is first released via the AMSAT-NA 20-meter net held each Sunday on 14.282 MHz. Pre-net operations start at 18:00 UTC, with current ANS bulletins transmitted to the western U.S. at 19:00 UTC and to the eastern U.S. at 19:30 UTC. ANS is also released worldwide via the AMSAT ANS e-mail reflector. AMSAT-NA is pleased to announce that recent and future development in Amateur Radio satellites will take place in Atlanta, Georgia at the 19th Space Symposium and AMSAT-NA Annual Meeting, October 5-6, 2001. The 2001 Symposium Chairman is Steve Diggs, W4EPI. Contact W4EPI at: Diggs@daugherty.com Information on AMSAT-NA is available at the following URL: http://www.amsat.org (or from) AMSAT-NA 850 Sligo Avenue, Suite 600 Silver Spring, Maryland 20910-4703 Voice: 301-589-6062 FAX: 301-608-3410 Currently, AMSAT-NA supports the following (free) mailing lists: * AMSAT News Service (ANS) * General satellite discussion (AMSAT-BB) * Orbit data (KEPS) * Manned space missions (SAREX) * District of Columbia area (AMSAT-DC) * New England area (AMSAT-NE) * AMSAT Educational Liaison mailing list (AMSAT-EDU) * AMSAT K-12 Educational Liaison mailing list (AMSAT-K12) A daily digest version is available for each list. To subscribe, or for more list information, visit the following URL: http://www.amsat.org/amsat/listserv/menu.html This edition of ANS is dedicated to the memory of Sue Miller, W9YL, of Waldron, Indiana, who died recently - reportedly after suffering a heart attack at age 78. Sue Miller was the XYL of well-known SSTVer Don Miller, W9NTP. [ANS thanks Chuck Crist, W9IH, and the ARRL for this information] ANS is also dedicated to the memory of past ANS editor 'BJ' Arts, WT0N, and to the memory of long-time AMSAT supporter Werner Haas, DJ5KQ. SB SAT @ AMSAT $ANS-338.01 PHASE 3D/AO-40 UPDATE AMSAT NEWS SERVICE BULLETIN 338.01 FROM AMSAT HQ SILVER SPRING, MD, DECEMBER 03, 2000 TO ALL RADIO AMATEURS BID: $ANS-338.01 General housekeeping tasks continue underway as ground stations test the complex systems onboard AMSAT OSCAR-40. Magnetorquing operations also continue. North American P3D Command Station operator Stacey Mills, W4SM, reports an S-band transmitter (S-1) has been activated, sending 400 baud telemetry (just like the V-band middle beacon transmitter). The transmitter will be activated at certain times - such as when reasonable squint angle and visibility are available. Stacey notes the V-band transmitter will remain on during S-1 operation. W4SM tells ANS that the S-1 antenna is highly directional "and at squint angles greater than 35-40 degrees I don't know how loud the signal will be. Also, at these relatively high off-pointing angles the normally right-hand circular polarization may be predominantly left-hand." Doppler correction at this frequency and at this point in the orbit will be dramatic. The AMSAT-BB has been active with AO-40 information, including a discussion about possible corrupted memory by space radiation - which all satellites are subject to. "Not to worry," reports W4SM. AO-40's IHU-1, which is mission critical, has RAD-hardened error detection and correction memory (EDAC). According to W4SM a "wash routine" checks this memory and repairs any bit errors. If bit errors are found the wash program updates the software error counter and then generates an 'event' - something ground control stations look for. IHU-2, which is not mission critical, has two memory banks. The primary memory bank contains functional program software that is EDAC memory. "There is also a large, secondary memory bank which is not hardened memory, but this memory isn't used for critical functions," reports W4SM, "it is used to store large amounts of non-critical data." The IHU-2 also contains flash ROM which currently allows rapid rebooting of the IHU-2 (if needed). Stay tuned to ANS for additional bulletins from AMSAT, the official source of information on the Phase 3D satellite. [ANS thanks AMSAT-DL and AMSAT-NA for this information] /EX SB SAT @ AMSAT $ANS-338.02 PAS-1R HR AMSAT NEWS SERVICE BULLETIN 338.02 FROM AMSAT HQ SILVER SPRING, MD, DECEMBER 03, 2000 TO ALL RADIO AMATEURS BID: $ANS-338.02 Launched as the primary payload aboard the Ariane 5 rocket that orbited Phase 3D, ANS editor NN0DJ thought readers might like to know a bit more about PAS-1R. Weighing in at more than 10,000 pounds, PAS-1R is definitely a heavyweight in satellite communications in more ways than one. With 72 transponders, each supplying 36 MHz of bandwidth, PAS-1R has twice the capacity of PAS-1 and is substantially more powerful, adding new resources and technological advancements to PanAmSat's Atlantic Ocean Region fleet. The satellite offers a significant upgrade, providing higher power and coverage of four continents, including the Americas, Europe and Africa. The satellite will fuel the growth of PanAmSat's digital video and data offerings as well as new broadband Internet initiatives. PAS-1R will also play an integral role in the deployment of PanAmSat's broadcast network in Europe and Latin America. PAS-1R and PanAmSat's global satellite network form the backbone of the company business, allowing PanAmSat to offer communication services and end-to-end broadcast networks that deliver information and entertainment. [ANS thanks PanAmSat for this information] /EX SB SAT @ AMSAT $ANS-338.03 ARISS UPDATE HR AMSAT NEWS SERVICE BULLETIN 338.03 FROM AMSAT HQ SILVER SPRING, MD, DECEMBER 03, 2000 TO ALL RADIO AMATEURS BID: $ANS-338.03 Much is happening with Space Station Alpha and the ARISS program as this edition of ANS is broadcast. Last Thursday, space shuttle Endeavor was launched from Kennedy Space Center carrying five astronauts and giant solar wings for the International Space Station. A flawless Saturday docking with ISS put Endeavor in place for an ambitious construction mission as shuttle commander Brent Jett gently moved the 113-ton spacecraft toward the delicate station in a high-altitude ballet. Spacewalking astronauts are about to enter somewhat uncharted territory at the International Space Station as they set out this week to mount a giant pair of power-producing solar panels atop the 13-story station. Closer to home, ARISS spokesman Will Marchant, KC6ROL, reports to ANS that the ARISS partners are currently meeting at the Goddard Space Flight Center in Maryland. The three-day session will update the current status of the ARISS program and attempt to map its future direction. Expected on hand were delegates from ARISS-Canada, ARISS-Europe, ARISS-Japan, ARISS-Russia and ARIS-USA, in addition to representatives of NASA, AMSAT-NA and MAREX-NA. SAREX Chairman Roy Neal, K6DUE, will serve as meeting moderator. ARISS rules and bylaws development and ratification tops the list of discussion items. KC6ROL said he hopes ARISS can ramp up the level of school and casual contacts after the first of the year. A tentative schedule of school contacts is pending. The topic of future contacts between ISS crew members and students is also on the agenda for this weekend's meeting. The ARISS delegates will look at how school contacts can be smoothly integrated into the ISS crew schedules. ARISS delegates also will be looking ahead to the next phase of Amateur Radio hardware on the ISS, which will include more power and wider capabilities. More information about Amateur Radio on the ISS is available at the http://ariss.gsfc.nasa.gov/ web pages. [ANS thanks the ARISS team, Will Marchant, KC6ROL, and the ARRL for this information] /EX SB SAT @ AMSAT $ANS-338.04 ANS IN BRIEF HR AMSAT NEWS SERVICE BULLETIN 338.04 FROM AMSAT HQ SILVER SPRING, MD, DECEMBER 03, 2000 TO ALL RADIO AMATEURS BID: $ANS-338.04 ANS news in brief this week includes the following: ** The ARRL Board of Directors will review the League's position on the Morse code as an international licensing requirement when it gathers for its annual meeting in January. Because the issue is expected to come up at the IARU Region 2 Conference next October, the ARRL Executive Committee decided recently to place the issue on the Board's January agenda. -ARRL ** PanAmSat announced recently that Galaxy 7, a backup satellite that provides occasional services in the United States, has ceased transmissions due to the failure of an onboard system responsible for controlling the spacecraft and maintaining its position relative to Earth. The company does not expect the satellite to resume operations. -SpaceDaily ** Looking to decode AO-40's v-band beacon at 400 baud PSK and need a PSK demodulator to decode it? Information on demodulators is available from AMSAT at http://www.amsat.org/amsat/sats/ao40/ao40-tlm.html. -Paul, KB5MU ** A Boeing Delta 2 rocket successfully released three Earth research satellites into space hours after launching from Vandenberg Air Force Base. The rocket lifted off through clear skies and headed for the South Pole, where the satellites were placed into orbit over Earth's polar regions. -Florida Today ** The GE-8 telecommunications satellite, built for GE Americom, was recently shipped from production facilities in California to Kourou, French Guiana, where it will be readied for a late December Ariane launch. -SpaceDaily ** Nominations are open for the ARRL 2000 Technical Innovation and Microwave Development awards. The Technical Service Award winner will receive an engraved plaque and travel expenses to attend an ARRL convention for the formal award presentation. The Technical Innovation Award is presented annually to an Amateur Radio operator whose accomplishments and contributions are of the most exemplary nature within the framework of technical research, development and application of new ideas and future systems. The Technical Innovation Award winner will receive a cash award of $500, an engraved plaque and travel expenses to attend an ARRL convention for a formal presentation. The ARRL Microwave Development Award is given each year to the amateur whose accomplishments and contributions are the framework of microwave development, including adaptation of new modes, both in terrestrial formats and satellite techniques. The Microwave Development Award winner will receive an engraved plaque and travel expenses to attend an ARRL convention for a formal presentation. For more information contact ARRL Educational Programs Coordinator Jean Wolfgang, WB3IOS, at jwolfgang@arrl.org. -ARRL ** For consumers in remote areas of the nation, the brightest hope for quickly joining the next Internet revolution is sky-high. A handful of companies are behind an aggressive effort to use satellites to beam down Web pages at speeds dozens of times faster than standard dial-up connections. Satellites, with their high capacity and nearly blanket coverage, could increase the stakes in the race toward services for homes and businesses. That market is now dominated by cable and phone companies that use their lines to link consumers to the Web at quick speeds. -Florida Today ** CQ magazine has announced the establishment of the CQ Amateur Radio Hall of Fame, with goals of the new program to recognize individuals who have made significant contributions and to focus public attention on the far-reaching and long-standing value of Amateur Radio in society. Nominees will be judged on the basis of qualifying in one of two broad areas: individuals who have made significant contributions to the Amateur Radio hobby; and those radio amateurs who have made significant contributions to society in general. CQ will accept nominations for the inaugural Hall of Fame 'class' until March 31, 2001. -Rich Moseson, W2VU --ANS BULLETIN END--- /EX SB SAT @ AMSAT $ANS-338.05 WEEKLY SATELLITE REPORT PART 1 AMSAT NEWS SERVICE BULLETIN 338.05 FROM AMSAT HQ SILVER SPRING, MD, DECEMBER 03, 2000 TO ALL RADIO AMATEURS BT BID: $ANS-338.05 Phase 3D / AMSAT OSCAR 40 / AO-40 V-band beacon: 145.898 MHz Launched: November 16, 2000 aboard an Ariane 5 launcher from Kourou, French Guiana. A 50-second video of the launch can be seen at: http://arianespace.com/interior/v135better.mov Status: Initial commissioning and housekeeping tasks continue underway Uplink/downlink frequency plan: http://www.amsat-dl.org/p3dqrg.html P3D Project leader Dr. Karl Meinzer, DJ4ZC, informed ANS that following the successful launch and injection into nominal orbit, "except for the UHF transmitter, everything was found to be nominal and working fine." Although safely in orbit, there is much work to be done with Phase 3D before the satellite is opened for general Amateur Radio use. Initial housekeeping tasks are now underway to verify the health of the many complex systems onboard - followed by bringing these systems online. Information for decoding AO-40 telemetry is available at the following sources: * p3dsetup.exe is by Nino Porcino, IZ8BLY: http://iz8bly.sysonline.it/P3D/index.htm * p3dtelem-win32.zip is by Thomas Sailer, HB9JNX/AE4WA: http://www.ife.ee.ethz.ch/~sailer/ham/p3d/ * TLMDEC for DOS by AMSAT-F: http://rackoon.thomson-csf.fr/amsatf.htm * P3T by Stacey Mills, W4SM: http://www.amsat.org/amsat/sats/ao40/ao40-tlm.html [ANS thanks AMSAT-NA and AMSAT-DL for this information] INTERNATIONAL SPACE STATION/ARISS Worldwide packet uplink: 145.990 MHz Region 1 voice uplink: 145.200 MHz Region 2/3 voice uplink: 144.490 MHz Worldwide downlink: 145.800 MHz TNC callsign RZ3DZR ARISS initial station launched September 2000 aboard shuttle Atlantis Status: Operational (although current ISS workload is limiting operation) Planning for the deployment and use of the ham system aboard ISS has been an international effort coordinated by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. The effort began in 1996 with the formation of the Amateur Radio International Space Station organization. ARISS is made up of delegates from major national amateur radio organizations, including AMSAT. Two U.S. callsigns have recently been issued for Amateur Radio operations with ISS. The FCC granted vanity callsigns NA1SS and NN1SS to the International Space Station Amateur Radio Club in mid-October. The NA1SS callsign will be used aboard ISS, and NN1SS will be used for ground-based transmissions from the Goddard Space Flight Center. Russian callsign RZ3DZR and German call sign DL0ISS have previously been issued for use aboard the station. The crew may use their own callsigns (KD5GSL, U5MIR) or they may use one of the ISS calls. RZ3DZR is also the callsign entered into the TNC currently onboard Alpha. More information about the project can be found on the ARISS web site at http://ariss.gsfc.nasa.gov. [ANS thanks ARISS team member Will Marchant, KC6ROL, for this information] RADIO SPORT RS-13 Uplink 21.260 to 21.300 MHz CW/SSB Downlink 29.460 to 29.500 MHz CW/SSB Downlink 145.860 to 145.900 MHz CW/SSB Beacon 145.863 MHz Launched: February 5, 1991 aboard a Russian Cosmos C launcher Status: Unconfirmed mode Kevin Manzer, AC5DK, reports much confusion concerning the status of RS-12 and RS-13. "I've heard from a couple of people that it is in mode KT and a couple who say it's in mode T," said AC5DK, adding, "I'm hearing the 2-meter downlink beacon on 145.912 MHz, but no other activity. I can also hear the same beacon on 29.408 MHz (RS-12 must be on and RS-13 is off)?" ANS has no confirmed reports about what mode RS-12/13 is currently in. Earlier reports noted that RS-13 apparently had been switched to mode-T. In addition, several stations have also reported that the 29.408 MHz RS-12 beacon has been heard. The beacon telemetry indicated that both the 10 and 2-meter receivers aboard RS-12 are currently off. More information about RS-12 and RS-13 can be found on the AC5DK RS-12/13 Satellite Operators page at: http://www.qsl.net/ac5dk/rs1213/rs1213.html [ANS thanks Kevin Manzer, AC5DK, for this information] RADIO SPORT RS-15 Uplink 145.858 to 145.898 MHz CW/SSB Downlink 29.354 to 29.394 MHz CW/SSB Beacon 29.352 MHz (intermittent) SSB meeting frequency 29.380 MHz (unofficial) Launched: December 26, 1994 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome Status: Semi-operational, mode-A, using a 2-meter uplink and a 10-meter downlink Dave, WB6LLO, has operating information for both RS-15 (and RS-13) on his web site. In addition to satellite data, antenna information for mode-A operation is also featured. The WB6LLO web site URL is: http://home.san.rr.com/doguimont/uploads [ANS thanks Dave Guimont, WB6LLO, for this information] OSCAR 10 AO-10 Uplink 435.030 to 435.180 MHz CW/LSB Downlink 145.975 to 145.825 MHz CW/USB Beacon 145.810 MHz (unmodulated carrier) Launched: June 16, 1983 by an Ariane launcher from Kourou, French Guiana Status: Semi-operational, mode-B. AO-10 has been locked into a 70-cm uplink and a 2-meter downlink for several years DX continues to be worked (and heard) on AO-10. O-10 Very good conditions have been noted lately with PE5YES, UA6LP, DO2SW, OM3WBC, ZS5LEE, OE8TPK and F5OZK all active. Alan, ZL2VAL, reports contacts with KC0COU, NX7U, K6LG, K7AZ and N8OCX. W4SM has more information about the satellite at the following URL: http://www.cstone.net/~w4sm/AO-10.html [ANS thanks Stacey Mills, W4SM, for his AO-10 status information and web site] AMRAD AO-27 Uplink 145.850 MHz FM Downlink 436.795 MHz FM Launched: September 26, 1993 by an Ariane launcher from Kourou, French Guiana Status: Operational, mode J Periodically, AO-27's analog repeater will be turned off for a few days at a time to enable ground controllers to gather Whole Orbital Data (WOD), to verify the health of the satellite. An AO-27 question-and-answer page is available on the AMSAT-NA web site. The URL is: http://www.amsat.org/amsat/intro/ao27faq.html. AO-27 uses a method called Timed Eclipse Power Regulation (TEPR) to regulate the on-board batteries. In simple terms, TEPR times how long the satellite has been in an eclipse (or in the sun) and decides what subsystems to turn on or off. The current TEPR settings (as of November 25, 2000) are: TEPR 4 18 TEPR 5 36 The AO-27 pages on the AMSAT-NA web site include an explanation of TEPR AO-27 operations (at): http://www.amsat.org/amsat/sats/n7hpr/ao27.html [ANS thanks AMRAD for AO-27 information] UO-14 Uplink 145.975 MHz FM Downlink 435.070 MHz FM Launched: January 22, 1990 by an Ariane launcher from Kourou, French Guiana Status: Operational, mode J Tim, KG8OC, has updated the Michigan AMSAT Information site to include UO-14 information -- point your web browser to the following URL: http://www.qsl.net/kg8oc [ANS thanks Chris Jackson, G7UPN/ZL2TPO, for UO-14 information] SUNSAT SO-35 Mode J Uplink: 145.825 MHz FM Mode J Downlink: 436.250 MHz FM Mode B Uplink: 436.291 MHz FM Mode B Downlink: 145.825 MHz FM Launched: February 23, 1999 by a Delta II rocket from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California Status: Operational. SunSat is currently transmitting a greeting to AO-40: 'Greetings AMSAT OSCAR-40, 73 from SunSat OSCAR-35' The SunSat package includes 1200 and 9600 baud digital store-and-forward capability and a voice 'parrot' repeater system that will be used primarily for educational demonstrations in addition to Mode B/J operation. The satellite has two VHF and two UHF transmit-receive systems. For more information on SunSat, visit the following URL: http://sunsat.ee.sun.ac.za A summary of the active modes and frequency allocations for SunSat is available at the following URL: http://esl.ee.sun.ac.za/~lochner/sunsat/modes.html [ANS thanks Garth Milne, ZR1AFH, for this information] JAS-1b FO-20 Uplink 145.90 to 146.00 MHz CW/LSB Downlink 435.80 to 435.90 MHz CW/USB Launched: February 07, 1990 by an H1 launcher from the Tanegashima Space Center in Japan Status: Operational. FO-20 is in mode JA continuously Tak, JA2PKI, reported the FO-20 control station operators believe that the UVC (Under Voltage Controller) now is regulating the transponder. The UVC monitors battery voltage and tries to protect the batteries from over discharge. Tak notes that FO-20, launched in 1990, is now over 10 years old. [ANS thanks Kazu Sakamoto, JJ1WTK, for the FO-20 status reports] JAS-2 FO-29 Launched: August 17, 1996, by an H-2 launcher from the Tanegashima Space Center in Japan Status: Operational Voice/CW Mode JA Uplink 145.90 to 146.00 MHz CW/LSB Downlink 435.80 to 435.90 MHz CW/USB Digital Mode JD Uplink 145.850 145.870 145.910 MHz FM Downlink 435.910 MHz 1200 baud BPSK or 9600 baud FSK Callsign 8J1JCS Digitalker 435.910 MHz The JARL FO-29 command station has announced the following operation schedule of FO-29: through December 15 mode JA December 16 - 24 mode JD 1200 baud PSK Dec. 25 - Jan. 7 mode JA Mike, KF4FDJ, has put together a very informative document on FO-29, addressing the analog, digital and digi-talker modes. To obtain a copy e-mail Mike at: kf4fdj@amsat.org. Mineo, JE9PEL, has a FO-29 satellite telemetry analysis program that will automatically analyze all digital telemetry from the satellite (such as current, voltage and temperature). The JE9PEL FO-29/shareware is available at the following URL: http://www.ne.jp/asahi/hamradio/je9pel/ [ANS thanks Kazu Sakamoto, JJ1WTK, for the FO-29 status reports] SAUDISAT-1A Uplink to be released Downlink 437.075 MHz Broadcast Callsign SASAT1-11 BBS SASAT1-12 Launched: September 26, 2000 aboard a converted Soviet ballistic missile from the Baikonur Cosmodrome Status: Commissioning stage, initial housekeeping tasks underway SaudiSat-1A will operate as 9600 baud digital store-and-forward systems as well analog FM repeater mode capability. One of two new ham satellites from the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia built by the Space Research Institute at the King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology. SAUDISAT-1B Uplink to be released Downlink 436.775 MHz Broadcast Callsign SASAT2-11 BBS SASAT2-12 Launched: September 26, 2000 aboard a converted Soviet ballistic missile from the Baikonur Cosmodrome Status: Commissioning stage, initial housekeeping tasks underway SaudiSat-1B will operate as 9600 baud digital store-and-forward systems as well analog FM repeater mode capability. One of two new ham satellites from the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia built by the Space Research Institute at the King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology. /EX SB SAT @ AMSAT $ANS-338.06 WEEKLY SATELLITE REPORT PART 2 AMSAT NEWS SERVICE BULLETIN 338.06 FROM AMSAT HQ SILVER SPRING, MD, DECEMBER 03, 2000 TO ALL RADIO AMATEURS BT BID: $ANS-338.06 TIUNGSAT-1 Uplink 145.850 or 145.925 MHz 9600 baud FSK Downlink 437.325 MHz Broadcast callsign MYSAT3-11 BBS MYSAT3-12 Launched: September 26, 2000 aboard a converted Soviet ballistic missile from the Baikonur Cosmodrome Status: Unconfirmed, 38k4 baud FSK was reported to be operational TiungSat-1 is Malaysia's first micro-satellite and in addition to commercial land and weather imaging payloads offers FM and FSK Amateur Radio communication. TiungSat-1, named after the mynah bird of Malaysia, was developed as a collaborative effort between the Malaysian government and Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd. For more information on TiungSat-1, visit the following URL: http://www.yellowpages.com.my/tiungsat/tiung_main.htm [ANS thanks Chris Jackson, G7UPN/ZL2TPO, for this information] KITSAT KO-25 Uplink 145.980 MHz FM (9600 baud FSK) Downlink 436.500 MHz FM Broadcast Callsign HL02-11 BBS HL02-12 Launched: September 26, 1993 by an Ariane launcher from Kourou, French Guiana Status: Operational Jim, AA7KC, reports nominal KO-25 operation. [ANS thanks Jim Weisenberger, AA7KC, for KO-25 status information] UOSAT UO-22 Uplink 145.900 or 145.975 MHz FM 9600 baud FSK Downlink 435.120 MHz FM Broadcast Callsign UOSAT5-11 BBS UOSAT5-12 Launched: July 17, 1991 by an Ariane launcher from Kourou, French Guiana Status: Operational Jim, AA7KC, reports nominal UO-22 operation with heavy traffic and continuing major sat-gate operation. More information on the satellite is available at the following URL: http://www.sstl.co.uk/ [ANS thanks Chris Jackson, G7UPN/ZL2TPO, for UO-22 status information] OSCAR-11 Downlink 145.825 MHz FM (1200 baud AFSK) Mode-S Beacon 2401.500 MHz Launched: March 1, 1984 by a Delta-Thor rocket from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California Status: Operational OSCAR-11 celebrated its sixteenth birthday in space on March 1, 2000. During the period through November 14, 2000 good signals have been received from the 145 MHz beacon as the satellite is currently seeing good solar conditions which should continue until the end of the year. Ground control stations have reset the magnetorquer counters, the spin period has varied between 217 and 276 seconds. The battery voltage observed during daylight passes is unchanged with an average value of 14.0, with a range of 13.9 to 14.1 volts. Internal temperatures have increased slightly and are probably near maximum value. They are now 6.6 C and 4.8 C for battery and telemetry electronics. A single WOD survey of dated 06-October-2000, has been transmitted. The mode-S beacon is transmitting an unmodulated carrier. The beacon is a useful test source for mode-S converters. The 435.025 MHz beacon is normally off but can sometimes be heard when the satellite is being commanded by ground control. The operating schedule is as follows: ASCII status (210 seconds) ASCII bulletin (60 seconds) BINARY SEU (30 seconds) ASCII TLM (90 seconds) ASCII WOD (120 seconds) ASCII bulletin (60 seconds) BINARY ENG (30 seconds) The ASCII bulletin is currently a static message, detailing modes and frequencies of all active amateur radio satellites. More information on OSCAR-11 is available at the following URL: http://www.users.zetnet.co.uk/clivew/ [ANS thanks Clive Wallis, G3CWV, for OSCAR-11 status information] LUSAT LO-19 Uplink 145.84 145.86 145.88 145.90 MHz FM (using 1200 baud Manchester FSK) CW downlink 437.125 MHz Digital downlink 437.150 MHz SSB (RC-BPSK 1200 baud PSK) Broadcast Callsign LUSAT-11 BBS LUSAT-12 Launched: January 22, 1990 by an Ariane launcher from Kourou, French Guiana Status: Semi-operational. The CW beacon is sending eight telemetry channels and one status channel on 437.136 MHz. No BBS service is available. The digipeater is not active. Telemetry (limited) is as follows: Sat Nov 18 at 11:41:24 2000 LUSAT HIHI 60 AUN ABB AVA ADU AU4 A6E A44 AE6 Mineo, JE9PEL, has recorded LO-19 CW and PSK telemetry and placed the information on his Internet homepage site at: http://www.ne.jp/asahi/hamradio/je9pel/ General information and telemetry samples can be found at: www.telecable.es/personales/ea1bcu [ANS thanks Miguel Menendez, EA1BCU, for LO-19 status information] PACSAT AO-16 Uplink 145.90 145.92 145.94 145.96 MHz FM (using 1200 baud Manchester FSK) Downlink 437.025 MHz SSB (RC-BPSK 1200 baud PSK) Mode-S Beacon 2401.1428 MHz Broadcast Callsign: PACSAT-11 BBS PACSAT-12 Launched: January 22, 1990 by an Ariane launcher from Kourou, French Guiana Status: Semi-operational Russ, WJ9F, reported the S-band transmitter is off. The VHF uplink and the UHF PSK transmitter are operational (TX power at 1.5 watts). The digipeater command is on. Telemetry is as follows: uptime is 294/08:12:04. Time is Sun Dec 03 11:43:05 2000 +X (RX) Temp -3.027 D RX Temp 0.603 D Bat 1 Temp 7.260 D Bat 2 Temp 5.444 D Baseplt Temp 7.865 D PSK TX RF Out 1.488 W RC PSK BP Temp -0.002 D RC PSK HPA Tmp -0.607 D +Y Array Temp 4.839 D PSK TX HPA Tmp 4.839 D +Z Array Temp 2.419 D Total Array C= 0.402 Bat Ch Cur=-0.074 Ifb= 0.029 I+10V= 0.383 TX:1008 BCR:80 PWRC:05C BT:1E WC:25 EDAC:1D A new WOD collection of current graphics along with general information and telemetry samples can be found at: www.telecable.es/personales/ea1bcu [ANS thanks Miguel Menendez, EA1BCU, for AO-16 status information] TMSAT-1 TO-31 Uplink 145.925 MHz (9600 baud FSK) Downlink 436.925 MHz (9600 baud FSK) Broadcast Callsign: TMSAT1-11 BBS TMSAT1-12 Launched: July 10, 1998 by a Zenit rocket from the Baikonur Cosmodrome Status: Operational Launched: July 10, 1998 by a Zenit rocket from the Baikonur Cosmodrome Status: Operational Jim, AA7KC, reports nominal TO-31 operation, with moderate traffic. New graphic files are available on TO-31 dated November 30th. ProcMail V2.00G has been released by G7UPN. This software permits the processing of image files from TO-31. It has been posted to the AMSAT-NA FTP site at the following URL: http://www.amsat.org/amsat/software/win32/wisp Many of the high-resolution color images transmitted by TMSAT are compressed using a UoSAT compression format. This format is supported by the VK5HI CCD display program. [ANS thanks Chris Jackson, G7UPN/ZL2TPO, for TO-31 status information] UoSAT-12 UO-36 Uplink 145.960 MHz (9600 baud FSK) Downlink 437.025 MHz 437.400 MHz Broadcast Callsign UOSAT12-11 BBS UOSAT12-12 Launched: April 21, 1999 by a Russian launcher from the Baikonur Cosmodrome Status: Operational UO-36 carries a number of imaging payloads, digital store-and-forward communications and mode L/S transponders. NASA has demonstrated on UO-36 the ability to use standard Internet protocols to communicate with an orbiting spacecraft (just like any node on the Internet). NASA has been developing this project by working with the commercial payload aboard UoSAT-12. The BBS is open, although uploading and downloading may be disabled at times. The VK5HI viewer shareware for UO-36 is available on the AMSAT-NA web site at the following URL: ftp://ftp.amsat.org/amsat/software/win32/display/ccddsp97-119.zip Further information on UO-36 is available from: http://www.sstl.co.uk/ [ANS thanks Chris G7UPN/ZL2TPO, and the University of Surrey for this information] ITAMSAT IO-26 Uplink 145.875 145.900 145.925 145.950 MHz FM (1200 baud) Downlink 435.822 MHz SSB Broadcast Callsign ITMSAT1-11 BBS ITMSAT1-12 Launched: September 26, 1993 by an Ariane launcher from Kourou, French Guiana Status: Semi-operational, the digipeater function is on and open for APRS users [ANS thanks ITAMSAT Project Manager Alberto E. Zagni, I2KBD, for IO-26 information] /EX SB SAT @ AMSAT $ANS-338.07 WEEKLY SATELLITE REPORT PART 3 AMSAT NEWS SERVICE BULLETIN 338.07 FROM AMSAT HQ SILVER SPRING, MD, DECEMBER 03, 2000 TO ALL RADIO AMATEURS BT BID: $ANS-338.07 THE FOLLOWING ARE IN ORBIT BUT ARE NON-OPERATIONAL AT THIS TIME: KITSAT KO-23 Uplink 145.900 MHz FM (9600 baud FSK) Downlink 435.170 MHz FM Broadcast Callsign HLO1-11 BBS HLO1-12 Launched: August 10, 1992 by an Ariane launcher from Kourou, French Guiana Status: Intermittent operation with the downlink transmitter operating at unpredictable intervals Jim, AA7KC, reports that KO-23's downlink transmitter continues in non-operational status. Duration of this status is unpredictable. Last received downlink was on October 28th. KyungHee Kim, HL0ENJ, reports (from the KO-23 control team) that part of the problem with non-operation has been the power budget aboard the satellite. "We are not sure when the bird might turn off again due to insufficient power. The capability of the onboard power system has been less and less," said Kim. HL0ENJ also noted that as of October 30, 2000 the onboard computer was reset and a reboot of operational software is now underway. [ANS thanks Jim Weisenberger, AA7KC ------------------------------------------------------------------------ Alexander RZ6HGG Stavropol E-mail:rz6hgg@skiftel.ru FidoNet: 2:5064/11.30 6 декабря 2000 г. 18:02:28


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